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Tag: tax extension

Posts Tagged ‘tax extension’

April 15, 2020 is the Last Chance to Claim Your 2016 Refund!

Posted by Manisha Hansraj on May 6, 2019
Last modified: May 9, 2019

2016 refund

Set an alarm on your phone, write on your notepad or put an “x” on your calendar.

Like most taxpayers, you may be rushing to claim your prior year refunds. If you remember that you have a 2016 refund waiting for you, you’re not too late.

Read below to find out if you can still claim your refund.

Can I still claim my refund?

Luckily, because of the IRS Statute of Limitations for prior year refunds. You have three years from the original tax deadline of your return to claim your refund. Otherwise, your refund expires and goes straight to the IRS. That being said, the original tax deadline for 2016 taxes was April 18, 2017, due to April 15th falling on the weekend and Emancipation Day right after.

Deadline to claim your refund

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Tax Deadlines for the 2019 Tax Season!

Posted by Manisha Hansraj on April 12, 2019
Last modified: April 12, 2019

2019 tax deadlines

Important upcoming deadlines you need to know.

Tax season is a stressful time for some taxpayers. However, knowing each tax deadline will give you a heads up so you know how to stay on top of your game.

For all the 2019 tax deadlines that are left, take a look at the list of due dates below.

April 15, 2019

  • Individual Income Taxes deadline
  • Last day to file and pay if you owe taxes to the IRS without accumulating penalties
  • Final day to file a tax extension to the IRS
  • First Estimated Quarterly Tax Payment due
  • Sole proprietor, LLC, and corporation taxes due
  • IRA contribution deadline
  • Last day to postmark, paper-file and claim your 2015 refund

April 17, 2019

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Can I Deduct My W-2 Job Expenses?

Posted by Manisha Hansraj on March 28, 2019
Last modified: March 28, 2019

w-2 job expenses

The new tax season brought in a lot of changes, and your job expenses are one of them.

If you’ve noticed on your tax returns that you can’t deduct your W-2 job expenses for 2018, you’re partially correct. Unfortunately, not everyone can claim their out-of-pocket job expenses.

Here’s the breakdown.

Eligibility

The new tax laws have narrowed down on who claims their W-2 job expenses, mainly by their occupation.

You can only deduct your job expenses if you’re one of the following: (more…)

Can I pay my federal taxes with a credit card?

Posted by Manisha Hansraj on September 10, 2018
Last modified: September 18, 2018

Can you pay federal taxes with credit card

The IRS can’t directly accept credit card payments due to tax laws.

However, they can accept payments through a third-party processor. For example, online tax preparation companies are third-party processors since they are designated by a merchant to handle transactions for merchant acquiring banks. They can then assist you in making your credit card payment towards your tax bill to the IRS.

Here’s what you need to be prepared for when you plan on using the credit route.

There are no flat fees when using your credit card.

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How to File your First Tax Return

Posted by Michelle O'Brien on November 13, 2015
Last modified: November 2, 2016

Filing your first tax return is a bit like doing your laundry.

You don’t want to do it. You’d prefer someone just did it for you. But if you don’t do it, you know there will be consequences. 

Unlike laundry, you’ll need to do a bit more sorting, as in sorting through of all those tax forms. And unlike laundry, you really should know the basics before you start. Don’t worry though: you’ll get through it and probably even get a refund afterwards.

 

Find out if you are being claimed as a dependent!

The first thing you should do is talk to your parents. Since they’ve been claiming you as a dependent since before you could even utter the words, ‘tax return’, make sure they know you are planning on filing for yourself to avoid being rejected by the IRS. Each and every person is allowed to claim a personal exemption for themselves or their dependent. However, only one exemption can be claimed per person.

Here’s a classic scenario:

Abby was just hired as a barista at that awesome new cafe downtown. She makes a decent income and her co-worker mentions that she could probably cash in on a nice refund come tax time. Being that Abby is only 17 and earning less than the threshold allotted by the IRS, her parents can still claim her as a dependent on their return. If Abby files a tax return and claims the personal exemption for herself, not noting that she is being claimed as a dependent, and then her parents claim the personal exemption for Abby on their return, the IRS will reject the last tax return submitted.

 

Do you know the age requirements to be claimed as a dependent?

Although your age doesn’t specifically determine if you need to file a tax return, it is a key player in whether or not you can be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s taxes. When it comes to age, you can only be claimed as a qualifying child dependent if one of the following is true: (more…)

What’s the Penalty for Filing Federal Taxes Late

Posted by admin on March 4, 2009
Last modified: June 25, 2019

late filing penalties

Taxes take a big bite out of your income, but that bite gets bigger with the addition of late filing penalties.

How much bigger? It depends on what you’re late on, and how late you are.

For example, there are penalties for late filing, not paying at all, and both can be combined.

Here are some facts.

Taxpayers with refunds can file late without penalties. In other words, only taxpayers with a tax due to the IRS face penalties. (more…)